2018 SHOW NEWS

Up and running

From now until August 12, I've got paintings in the Housatonic Valley Art League Member show in Great Barrington, Mass. This year, HVAL shows are in the basement of the town's Masonic Lodge, which is located on Route 7 between Berkshire Bank and the Great Barrington Post Office. Stop by if you have a chance! 

The Wild Garden is a view of a favorite garden at Wave Hill, a wonderful garden along the Hudson River in the Bronx. I painted Heart of Gold in late winter, when I was desperate for some vibrant color. And what better way to delve into purple, by exploring the abstractions to be found in the irises that grow in the front yard of our New Rochelle home.

Winners and losers 

So far this year, I've submitted paintings to many shows. Some have won prizes. Some have been rejected, most recently both my entries to the Greenwich Art Society's summer show in the Flinn Gallery in the Greenwich Library. (I like the ones I submitted a lot, though, and you can see them here—The Quiet Pool and Water and Ice.)

And sometimes a painting that's rejected for one show wins a prize in another. That happened with The Field in Late Summer. It was rejected by the  Greenwich Art Society's spring show at the Bendheim Gallery in Greenwich and won a prize—honorable mention—in the Housatonic Valley Art League's June/July Juried show. That show was judged by Phil Knoll, an artist/curator, and Geoff Young, who runs a gallery in Great Barrington.

My other submission to this year's Bendheim show, Last Light, was accepted, and it won a prize. The judge for that show was Randall R. Griffey, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Yupo demonstrations

In addition to painting and getting ready for shows, I took a small step toward teaching this spring. I was asked to do a series of demonstrations of how to paint on Yupo, the synthetic paper I've been using for some time now. Three of the demos were for the Greenwich Art Society, and one for the Art Society of Old Greenwich.

Because it takes time for the pools of water and paint to dry on this non-absorbent paper, I used an old Julia Childs technique, and painted till my scene was too wet to go any farther without making a mess and then whipped out a previous done "half baked" version that let me keep painting until the scene was closer to completion. 

Doing a demonstration turns out to be exhausting. It's hard to paint and talk at the same time! Anna Patalano, the head of the Greenwich Art Society school, stayed for the first demonstration and was able to provide valuable "color commentary" while I worked. In later demonstrations, I got better at being able to pause and talk and ask for questions. 

Altogether, about 20 people paid to watch me paint. Amazing!

Sales from the bin

So far, my only sales this year have been a couple of "bin works" —matted but unframed pieces—that sold at the Maplebrook School Benefit Show in Amenia, N.Y., in May. This year, the organizers of that show enhanced how they set up the bins, adding dividers with the artists' names on them. Did that do the trick, or was it the chance to own a wonderful original painting for not that much money? One of the paintings that sold was a favorite I'd done last winter that I called The Promise of Happiness because it made me feel happy. (Coming up with names for paintings is a challenge!)

Art for less

Speaking of art for less, high-quality giclee prints these days are very pleasing and look quite "real." You could get a nearly full-sized print made from most of the the works shown here for less than $200. 

Most shows don't let you put such prints into their bins, but the organizers of the Trinity Church shows in Limerock, Conn., do. When that May show called for entries, I got out the three giclee prints I'd had made as a test and was amazed all over again at how fine they looked. Sadly, none of them sold. Two framed works were also accepted into that show.

A recent favorite

Here's a painting that I finished too late to have framed for this summer's Flinn show, but I quite like how it came out. It's a scene from Umpachene Falls in New Marlborough, Mass., the next town east from Sheffield. It was a very rainy June so the falls were in full spate when Rob and I went over there in early July to walk and take pictures. 

You can see more recent works here

AScott1896SpillingOver.jpg

Spilling Over, a close-up view of Umpachene Falls.

 


 At the HVAL show up July/August: The Wild Garden.

At the HVAL show up July/August: The Wild Garden.

 Also in the HVAL July/August show: Heart of Gold.

Also in the HVAL July/August show: Heart of Gold.

 The Quiet Pool. 

The Quiet Pool. 

 Water and Ice. Yes, pretty wintry for a summer show but the theme of the show was "Realism and Abstraction," and this is one of my more abstract landscapes.

Water and Ice. Yes, pretty wintry for a summer show but the theme of the show was "Realism and Abstraction," and this is one of my more abstract landscapes.

 The Field in Late Summer. Rejected in one show, prize-winner in another.

The Field in Late Summer. Rejected in one show, prize-winner in another.

 Tiny Waterfall, also in the HVAL June/July show.

Tiny Waterfall, also in the HVAL June/July show.

 Bendheim Show in the spring: Last Light wins a prize.

Bendheim Show in the spring: Last Light wins a prize.

 The Promise of Happiness, a small unframed work that sold this spring.

The Promise of Happiness, a small unframed work that sold this spring.

Giclee prints are a way to enjoy
my art for less. The prints are made by a New York company known for fine art reproductions. 

If you like one of these paintings and would like a print send me an email

  • Signed 8x12-inch prints matted to 16x20: $120.
  • Signed 12x18-inch prints matted to 18x24: $170.